A Week of Market Meals

The Downtown Bloomington Farmers Market sends a handy e-mail before every market; the “What’s Fresh and Fun” e-mail lists every vendor and what they’re bringing with them on Saturday.  I use it to plan our meals during the week, and even though spring is just getting started, farmers have plenty of fresh, local food to share, from fresh produce to preserved fruit, locally raised meat and poultry and local grains.

Here’s a menu based on all of the vendors who will be at the market this week:

Make shakshuka for breakfast with Above Normal Eggs – the recipe calls for a touch of honey, which you can get from C & B Apiaries. Use that honey for another great breakfast – on toast with avocado with bread from Central Illinois Bakehouse.

Make a gourmet grilled cheese sandwich using gouda from Ludwig Farmstead Creamery. Compliment that sandwich with pickles from Trimble’s Produce Farm.

Dinner can be grilled pork from Huelskoetter Pork with arugula salad from PrairiErth Farm.  Make a sandwich with bacon (here are a bunch of ideas) from Destiny Meats . Check out the beef from Bauer Crops and Cattle and serve a roast with local potatoes, carrots, and a fresh salad – all from Saturday’s market.

I LOVE the dried herbs and spices from Granni’s Acres – I’ve been sprinkling their dehydrated veggies in everything. (Try adding their dried radish powder or jalapeño powder to soups or to mayo for sandwiches.)

Roast chicken from Dearing Country Farms. Use the leftover chicken to make sandwiches, soup, or salad.

Use herbs from Ackerman Certified Organic farm in everything.

See you at the Market!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Springtime at the Market

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Although the calendar says “late April,” winter has been reluctant to leave us this year. But at least the farmer’s market is here to reassure us that spring really is on the way.

How do you know spring has sprung? Because, in addition to our reliable root staples, at you’ll find a variety of spring greens at the market to help reclaim your sanity after our loooong winter.

Spring veggies also inspire lighter meals with easy preparation. Some spring greens are delicate and tender, and require a light touch with dressing – perhaps just a touch of olive oil and a spritz of lemon juice.  Greens like arugula are spicy or even bitter, and are great paired with a contrasting flavor – a sweet dressing or fruit, or something rich and robust, such as bacon or chicken thighs.

The recipes below combine spring greens with other market staples that you should be able to find this week.

Breakfast

Make-ahead, freezer-friendly spinach feta breakfast wrap (lots of ways to switch up the ingredients here).

Use fresh mint from the market in a pineapple, arugula and Macadamia nut smoothie. (You can sub almonds – buy them in bulk at Common Ground Grocery.)

Salad for breakfast? Absolutely! This savory “breakfast buddha bowl” features springtime asparagus, greens, avocado, and a fresh egg.

Skipping the greens? Thomas Keller’s BLT fried egg-and-cheese sandwich is probably just as good without the tomato (patience, readers! The tomatoes are coming). You could always top with some locally-made salsa.

Oatmeal is always a winner, especially with local maple syrup (or “sirup“!).

How about savory oatmeal with greens and yogurt? (Here’s an overnight oats version.)

You could definitely top breakfast fried rice with chopped greens (look for Illinois-grown Cahokia rice at Green Top Grocery).

WHOLE WHEAT PANCAKES. (Or waffles, which freeze and reheat well in the toaster.) You’ll find locally grown wheat at the market from Ackerman Farms and Funk’s Grove pancake mix at Green Top Grocery.

And sausage, spinach, and apple breakfast sandwiches are a nice twist on the usual egg-based breakfast sandwich.

Lunch

Arugula and carrot salad with walnuts and cheese (you could also add another protein, like chick peas or chicken).

Green gazpacho is portable and healthy.

Just in case you want something without greens: roasted carrot soup (so many variations!).

Avocado, arugula and walnut sandwiches would be great on a hearty local bread (add ham or bacon if you’re a carnivore).

Dinner

Days are getting warmer, but nights are still chilly. I like the idea of this white bean and vegetable bowls with “frizzled” eggs (topped with fresh greens, of course!). That’s something that would come together quickly on a weeknight after work.

It’s time to fire up the grill again. Make grilled chicken with arugula and chick peas (think of the leftovers!).

Use this green harissa as a marinade, a sauce, or a condiment.

Root veggies shine in this potato and arugula salad (Smitten Kitchen adds lentils, swaps greens for parsley).

Is anything more welcome than spring herbs? Check out these options for herb-based sauces that you can put on virtually anything.

And remember, everyone – this is just the beginning! See you at the indoor market this weekend, and at the OPENING DAY of the 2018 outdoor market on Saturday, May 5 at the square in downtown Bloomington!

 

 

A December Market Menu!

It’s time for the December Indoor Market, and a special edition of the Market Menu!

The indoor market is held at the Grossinger Arena in downtown Bloomington. Use the Front St. entrance for the December market; the vendors will be in the space just inside those doors, by the concessions. Free parking is available around the corner by the Pepsi ice center, or across the street.

The following vendors are expected to attend:

Above Normal Eggs – organically fed, free range, on pasture chicken AND duck eggs
Ackerman Certified Organic Farm & More – greens, herbs, and Brussel sprouts
Bauer Crops & Cattle – beef
Browns Fresh Produce – produce and popcorn
C & B Apiaries
Central Illinois Bakehouse – breads and pastries, including German stollen
Cracked Up Pottery
Dearing Country Farms – eggs
Destiny Meats – pork
Grani’s Acres, LLC
Grandpa Bill’s Gluten Free Bread – gluten-free gingerbread and cookies!
Herbonita Soap Company, Inc.
Huelskoetter Pork – pork sausage, pork burgers, and more
Ludwig Farmstead Creamery
Pollen and Pastry – cookies, candy, and pastries
PrairiErth Farm – root vegetables, cabbages, fennel, leeks, wellness products
Smoothis Natural Skincare
Trimble’s Produce Farm
Umland’s Pure Dry Cheese

The variety of meat, dairy, and produce available through the winter is pretty amazing right now! Here are just a few recipes that feature some of the items available at the December market:

 

Breakfast wheat berry bowl – if you want to save some time, I bet these would cook up superquick in the Instant Pot! (also: wondering about wheat berries? Check out this post on The Spruce).

Roasted root vegetables with rosemary

Perfect one-pan mashed potatoes (made even more delicious with the use of chicken or duck fat!)

Charred chicken with sweet potatoes and oranges

Colcannon – a sort of potato / leek / cabbage mash (with cream and butter)

Sweet potato rolls – gorgeous little puffs made with sweet potato in addition to flour

Sweet potato pancakes (latkes)

Beet and feta burgers – this recipe uses grated beets, so any size will do

Winter eggs – cooked in a ramekin with bread cubes, walnuts and sage

 

A Legit Local Thanksgiving

 

Late November often finds us slogging through cold, damp and dark days – hardly the kind of weather that says “bountiful vegetables.”

already thinking about morning-after-thanksgiving fry-ups.

AND YET, thanks to our farmers, the onset of cold weather hasn’t dimmed the wide variety of fresh veggies available to us in central Illinois.  You’ll find greens, lettuces, carrots, potatoes and tons of other root veggies, Brussels sprouts, squashes, fresh herbs – and every year, a couple of vendors work some kind of voodoo and bring along some tomatoes that were picked green and slowly ripened on a window sill or something (get there early for those. You’re already pining for fresh tomatoes, aren’t you? Me too).

 

Beyond fresh produce, you’ll always find plenty of eggs, meat (even turkeys!), cheeses, dried peppers, dried herbs, breads, cakes and pies.

Basically, the market has everything you need for a great Thanksgiving meal – all fresh, local, and grown just for you! The Thanksgiving Market’s Facebook event page has a list of this year’s vendors.

Plenty of must-make Thanksgiving dishes are really quite simple – mashed potatoes, sweet potato casserole, piles of veggies. But fresh, local veggies are going to elevate any dish you serve.

In the Legit Local spirit, Steph and I wanted to bring you some ideas for helping keep Thanksgiving simple so you can enjoy yourself and, of course, eat well.

 

rosemary and thyme frozen mid-summer, to be thawed for compound butter. 

Prep Ahead, Hands-Off Cooking

 

How to juggle all those dishes? I can personally vouch for this approach to make-ahead mashed potatoes. Serious Eats also has some helpful ideas.

Also, if you’re making a traditional mashed potato, be sure to select a variety that is suited for that preparation. The most popular variety of mashing potato in the U.S. is the russet, but keep your eye out for types like Purple Viking. It’s purple on the outside but bright white inside, and it’s delicious. A strategy for freeing up stove and oven space is to cook stuffing in the slow cooker.

 

No Tofurky Needed 

The farmers at the market will give you wonderful options for sides that double as hearty meals for meatless eaters. Martha has a bunch of creative dishes that are vegetarian- friendly – I’m really into this roasted squash with shallots, grapes and sage.

Simple veggie sides can round out your meal without being too terribly complicated. Roast some carrots with balsamic vinegar. Parmesan-roasted cauliflower will introduce some adventure onto the table but won’t scare the in-laws.

People swear up and down that they dislike Brussels sprouts – until they have them roasted with balsamic vinegar (I never bother with the pancetta/bacon and it’s still great) or tossed in a quick sauté with (I KID YOU NOT) chopped pistachios – I promise, this is another dish that I often I bring, people look at suspiciously, try it, and then devour.

Feeling Fancy? I am eyeing up this butternut squash and leek bread pudding because… bread pudding.

Family Favorites

A Thanksgiving without sweet potatoes? In many households, that is unthinkable, so here are a few ideas:

Sweet Potato Casserole

Healthier Sweet Potato Casserole Options

Yes, Make the Salad!

I know what you’re saying: no one goes to Thanksgiving dinner to eat salad. Except me. (And I love ALL the Thanksgiving trimmings!) But most of the meal is typically so rich that I always crave something to balance it out – especially a fresh, raw salad. One that I’ve made and served for years is a roasted beet, orange, and arugula salad. And, yes – beets. Every year I bring or serve some version of this signature salad to dinner (because I’m selfish – I want to eat it!) and there are never, ever leftovers.

What’s more traditional for Thanksgiving than pumpkin pie? Here is how to instantly up your pie game: use fresh pumpkin. (Well, not instantly…it takes a bit more work, but it will be worth it.)

You’ll find local grains at the market, too – cornbread muffins, anyone? (I am thinking of leftover muffins with coffee on Friday morning, schmeared with jam.) Plenty of you out there make cornbread stuffing, too (there’s two links there – one for a “healthy” stuffing and the other…somewhat less so!).

Outside of the market itself, Common Ground Grocery and Green Top Grocery have what you need to complete meal prep, including additional groceries, spices, and local grains. Baking? Check out Decorator’s Grocery on Linden Street.

leeks!

Buy some veggies for later… 

OK…so here are some thoughts for the weekend AFTER Thanksgiving, when you’re going to be on a roll with great food, but maybe you need to counter the richness of that meal with a few days of simple and delicious options. How about:

Turnip, leek and potato soup

Spinach salad with seared shiitake mushrooms

Green salad with orange and avocado

Red leaf lettuce with roasted sweet potatoes

 

Got leftover turkey? Pair it with some wonderful root veggies in this turkey soup with root vegetables.

Whatever your cooking plans, we at Legit Local wish you a very Happy Thanksgiving filled with local vegetables and other products from our local food producers. See you at the Market!

 

 

 

 

The LAST Market Menu of the (outdoor) season!

Welcome back, friends!

Fall is definitely here, and so is the end of a fantastic outdoor market season. (The indoor market season continues once every month at the Coliseum.)

The good news is: you get to start planning for the Thanksgiving Market! The first indoor market of the season is Saturday, November 18 – doors open at 10am at the Bloomington (Grossinger Motors) Coliseum.  It’s a wonderful way to kick off the holiday season, just in time to shop for Thanksgiving Day meals. Also, we’ll be putting out a special Market Menu just for Thanksgiving.

But for now, let’s make some plans on how you’re going to use the fantastic local veggies you’ll find at THIS week’s market. The colder weather has us thinking of comfort foods to take away the chill, and easy and/or hands-off recipes that let you maximize your time away from the kitchen this week.

I’ve been doing a lot of shopping in the bulk isle, especially for beans, lentils, and other hearty proteins. Green Top Grocery and Common Grounds Natural Foods both have well-stocked bulk aisles – it’s a great place to experiment with new-to-you proteins and grains. Last night I needed a quick dinner that wouldn’t involve takeout and spied a jar of dried yellow split peas in my pantry. Pea soup! I sautéed what I had on hand in the pressure cooker pot: some onions, celery, and a couple of carrots, all diced. I added two diced potatoes and two cups of yellow split peas along with 8 cups of water and broth. I had some roasted tomatoes from the summer in the freezer (a can of tomatoes of any type would also work), so I added those along with a bay leaf. Put the top on, locked it, brought it to pressure and cooked for 30 minutes. Once the pressure released I opened the lid to see a velvety soup – that was dinner! We loved it.

My point is: it doesn’t take much to make a great, hearty soup – some beans, lentils, or split peas, some version of mirepoix, choose a spice profile, and add in whatever other veggies you’ve got on the counter (chunks of potato or diced squash) or in the fridge (add spinach, kale, or collard greens at the end, right before serving).

The following recipes can all be made in a slow cooker, instant pot/pressure cooker, or on the stove top. If you’re accustomed to dried green split peas, you might give yellow ones a try – they’ve got a milder, somewhat sweeter flavor and I think they cook just a bit faster. If you have a pressure cooker, they cook in 30 minutes or less. Like any bean or lentil, there are a gazillion flavor profiles you can choose from for a hearty, delicious soup:

Turkish split pea soup

French Canadian split pea soup

Moroccan split pea soup with Za’atar

Vegan split pea soup (slow cooker) 

Not a split pea fan? Plenty of options for your final outdoor farmer’s market meals.

Vegetarian chili with butternut squash and avocado

Pork carnitas (this would do just fine in a slow cooker)

Corn, chicken and poblano chowder (in the pressure cooker/instant pot)

Pumpkin chicken curry (in the slow cooker!)

And SQUASHES! We wait all year for these. Have you tried…

Stuffed butternut squash (meatless)

Stuffed butternut squash with sausage

Here are a plethora of spaghetti squash ideas…

Roasted delicata squash with pomegranate and arugula

Late fall salads are also on my radar. You’ll find lots of wonderful greens at the market this week – and try thinking outside the “greens salad” box (though I never get tired of a great greens salad!):

Shaved cauliflower salad

Radicchio and fennel panzanella

Za’atar sweet potatoes and kale

Fennel celery salad with walnuts (and blue cheese, or sub feta, etc.)

Kohlrabi Caesar

Spiced pumpkin, lentil and goat cheese salad

Collard greens and radishes with crispy shallots

Classic spinach salad

Arugula salad with apples and pecans

Did you really think you’d get past this last post of the outdoor season without a kale salad recipe?

I skipped ahead…these are great recipes for lunches or dinners. What about breakfast?

It’s hot cereal season! (Think add-ins: nuts and seeds from the bulk aisle; fresh local apples from the market.) Also:

STILL MY FAVORITE MUFFINS

A pumpkin muffin for you pumpkin spice lovers out there..

From both of us at Legit Local, we thank you for spending this outdoor farmer’s market season with us. See you at the market! — Steph and Jenn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Market Menu: October 14

watermelon radishes!

I honestly can’t tell most days whether it’s supposed to be fall or still summer. The leaves are just starting to change, the root vegetables are ABUNDANT, and occasionally there’s an actual chill in the air in central Illinois.

Since we’re wrapping back around, in a way, to some beginning-of-the-season offerings (greens, herbs, radishes), I thought I’d pull up selections from prior weeks. Do you have any favorites? We’d love to hear from you! Check out our Facebook page and message us!

Carrot salad w/ harissa & feta & mint

carrots

This dish is one of my favorites from Smitten Kitchen, and a great alternative to green salads when you have vegetarians to feed. It’s absolutely amazing when made with locally-grown carrots. If you haven’t had them raw, you’re in for a treat; they’re almost as surprising as a local tomato, I think. This recipe is great with or without the harissa — a spicy, garlic-y paste/spice mix. You can make your own, substitute it with another garlic-y chili paste, or just leave it out altogether.
Pantry Check / Shopping list: carrots, caraway seeds (optional), cumin seeds, paprika, harissa (optional), sugar, lemon, flat leaf parsley, fresh mint, feta cheese. 

 

 

 

 

 

Vegetable Frittata with Greens and Potato

eggsHere’s a base recipe for the frittata (from Epicurious).  To that base, add what you have! I like greens, herbs, potatoes, cheese, maybe some bacon or ground pork. If you have leftover roasted root veggies, chop them up (bite-sized) and add them as well; I think it actually works best when you have pre-cooked potatoes (or carrots or sweet potatoes)!

Pantry Check / Shopping List: chives, spinach or kale, eggs, potatoes, milk, sausage (optional), goat cheese (chevre).

Soups:

(Be sure to check out this post on soups generally)

Thai Carrot Sweet Potato Soup (Cookie and Kate, from the Oh She Glows Cookbook) – with red curry and peanut, lime and cilantro!!

Irish Carrot Soup (Food and Wine) – onion and potato, and lots of butter and cream

Polenta with Greens

So easy, though it does call for a lot of stirring. There are a lot of recipes out there for polenta with a braised or steamed green (try beet greens!). This recipe from Food.com has swiss chard and a topping with dried fruits and nuts, as well as cheese (which is a must for polenta, in my opinion).

 

Pantry Check / Shopping List: Swiss chard, crushed red pepper flakes, golden raisins, yellow cornmeal, milk, grated parmesan cheese, pine nuts.

Green Chickpea & Chicken Curry w/ Beet Greens

Green Chickpea & Chicken Curry w/… The recipe is written for swiss chard, but did you know that beet greens are like identical cousins? They’ll do very nicely in this recipe.
Pantry Check: chicken thighs, shallots, green curry paste, chili paste, ginger, coconut milk, chickpeas, greens

Extras:

Magic Sauce – From 101 Cookbooks, this stuff is like liquid gold… use it on eggs, pasta, potatoes, just about anything.
Pantry Check: fresh rosemary, fresh thyme, fresh oregano, paprika, garlic, bay leaves, red pepper flakes, lemon juice

 

 

Be sure to check out Jen’s post on beets — we can’t get enough of beets in my house, even though at least half of them end up pickled

Market Menu: October 7

It’s time for another Market Menu!

While fall brings some cooler-weather items back to the market, the list of offerings is HUUUUGE compared to spring! I don’t ever get tired of roasting root vegetables, and I could probably eat them every day, but I might not say that in a couple more weeks. So I definitely want to put some casseroles or soup into the freezer for busy weekdays later on. The roots don’t freeze so well, but most everything else does!

I’d love to get another batch of red pepper soup together, and maybe some chicken and vegetable. Neither are very labor-intensive, and they’re super tasty in the middle of winter. I’ll post recipes on our facebook page, such as they are.

So, what else is on the menu for the week?

Breakfasts:

Fall marks the return of some hot cereal options in my house:

whole wheat berries with fuit and honey and a splash of cream or yogurt. Once cooked (and they take quite a while to cook!), these keep well in the fridge for a second day, so I like to make a batch on the weekend. They’re even tasty cold, in a pinch.

For something hot and hearty, a big pan of frambled eggs with kale, magic sauce and some local sausage will do the trick. They actually aren’t bad pre-made and portioned into cups for enjoying later in the week. I like to chop the kale and sausage and mix them in with the eggs before putting into individual portion-sized containers. Add magic sauce when you reheat during the week (before putting in the microwave).

For a treat, how about some french toast (Pekara’s Paesano bread is AMAZING for this) with bacon and maple sirup? (if you still have some left!)

Lunches:

Leftovers are a life-saver for a busy October; I’m planning on making more stuffed peppers (before this amazing crop stops producing!), some casseroles and soups to enjoy for easy lunches. But I’ve also been playing with big mash-up bowls of goodies:

hummus, roasted sweet potato, lettuce, pickled beets, watermelon radishes, shaved carrots, quinoa and a little cheese, with some lemon-tahini dressing on top.

roasted carrots and parsnips, toasted bread, hard-boiled eggs, garbanzo beans, and feta or chevre.

Autumn Market Salad – Bon Appetit. With butternut squash, arugula, walnuts, oj and lemon.

Now playing at the market: Winter Squash!!! If you’re a fan of the acorn, butternut, hubbard, kabocha, delicata and other squashes, this is your time!

Dinners:

Potato-Leek Gratin – something to do with your leeks and potatoes besides soup!

Roasted Vegetable Pizza – the combo is up to you! I love little bits of things: pickled fennel, olives, dried tomatoes, sauteed onions (slow and low, to get them caramelized), chevre and pork sausage, with a little shredded mozzarella on top.

Butternut Squash, Apple and Onion Galette w/ Stilton – Food Network (but many versions of this recipe are out there, including this one without the apple, and this one with brie). A galette is a sort of pie with a freeform crust. Instead of baking in a pie plate, galettes are usually baked on a pan, with the edges folded over the ingredients (but not all the way to the center).  Don’t be intimidated by the pastry! A quick trip in the food processor will combine the ingredients, and a large ziploc bag works wonders at bringing the pastry together without making a mess. Galettes are fantastic to have in your repertoire, because you can use the pastry to wrap sweet or savory ingredients. And just like pies, you *could* freeze them for future baking.

Enjoy the last few weeks of the market! And don’t worry – – we’re not going away when the outdoor market shuts down for the season. We’ll be talking to our farmers about their winter cover crops and planning, writing about working through stored produce, and hunting for those elusive winter crops!!

Market Menu: September 30 – The EAT LOCAL Challenge!

Throughout September, the central Illinois chapter of Buy Fresh Buy Local is hosting the Eat Local challenge.  The challenge is to spend $20 a week on locally grown food during the month of September.

A week of meals based on $20 of local food? We’ve got this!

Five Days of Breakfast:

Carrot and apple smoothie – from Oprah.com
Market items: carrots, apples

Local oats (or wheat berries!) with your favorite toppings – from Epicurious. Oats are inexpensive and store easily, and it just might be chilly enough this weekend for a hot breakfast. The next time I make oatmeal, I’m going to try adding in some of my homemade applesauce — which is basically just chopped up apples left in a crock pot until they’re soft.
Market items: Oats! 

Crispy egg on toast – from Smitten Kitchen
Market items: eggs, bread

Scrambled tofu with greens – from Yup it’s Vegan. This is a great way to incorporate vegetables in your breakfast, if that’s a thing you want to do. You can also add in leftover roasted vegetables – sweet potatoes are delicious in a breakfast scramble, too.
Market items: greens!

Freezer-friendly breakfast burritos – from The Kitchn
Market items: eggs, potatoes, peppers, bacon or sausage

 

Five days of Lunches

Carrot Salad – This is a fantastic grated carrot salad with parsley and lemon, from Once Upon a Chef. While not a meal on its own, it would go well with some cheese and fruit and/or another assortment of things.  I’d put money on this going well with feta cheese, in particular. 
Market items: 
carrots, parsley, cheese, apples

The Peppers and Sausages below make great leftovers, if you chop up the sausages before packing into individual serving containers. Add some rice or bread for a hearty lunch.

My favorite and most reliable lunch these days is chicken and sweet potatoes and applesauce. We’re in the heart of sweet potato season now, so I suggest that you stock up. I like to peel and cut my sweet potatoes into large chunks and boil them (and then mash), or else cut in small-medium (1/2″) cubes and roast. I’ll bake the chicken with a glug of italian dressing and foil over the baking dish, and then retain some of the liquid that remains after cooking (otherwise the chicken can get dry). If you’re going to chop the chicken up after cooking, be sure to let it rest first — otherwise, you’ll definitely have dry chicken.

 

Five days of Dinners

Spicy Stuffed Cabbage Rolls – filled with rice, spicy pork, and fresh napa cabbage. Made by the Serious Eats folks, in their “Cook the Book” series, from Faith Durand’s Not Your Mother’s Casseroles. As the Serious Eats staff note, the filling can easily be customized for your family’s tastes:  less or more spicy, different vegetables, substituting ground beef for pork, etc.
Market items: Ground pork

Peppers and Sausages – done in the slow cooker, to serve in a bun or over rice.

The recipe is dead simple, and takes only 10 minutes in the morning.  Slice the peppers and onion (I’d probably do this the night before, and wrap gently – who wants to go to work with onion hands? not I!). Then you add whole-grain mustard and beer, and put the whole sausages on top, and let it cook for the day.

Not only has the weather turned perfectly just in time for hot dinners, but this has been an AMAZING season for peppers! Just check out these beauties at the market!!
Market items: Peppers, onions, sausages

 

 

Sheet Pan Chicken Thighs and Cabbage – from Food52. This calls for a head of green cabbage, and chicken thighs or drumsticks, and a simple quick marinade of sesame oil, soy sauce, vinegar, sriracha and salt and pepper. The cabbage goes in later – this is the key with sheet pan dinners, is getting the timing right. If you haven’t roasted cabbage or brussels sprouts before, you’re in for a treat. If it were me, I’d make some mashed potatoes to go along with this hearty dinner.
Market items: cabbage, chicken, potatoes

Roasted Root Vegetables and Hummus – if you’ve ever felt like making a dinner of appetizers, then this is your recipe. A combination of roasted vegetable chips and three different hummus recipes, to which I’d add some cooked quinoa and roasted broccoli, and maybe a hard-boiled egg. Some crusty bread, maybe.
Market items: beets, turnips, radishes, broccoli, eggs, bread

Vegetable Mulligatawny Soup – I adore this recipe from Madhur Jaffrey’s World Vegetarian. I’m not a vegetarian, but I make this at least once every fall, with an array of local vegetables. It calls for a long list of vegetables, but a small quantity of each: potatoes, carrots, turnips, basil, garlic, onion, plus fennel, cumin, coriander and peppercorns that you dry-roast in a pan and then grind fresh. It calls for vegetable stock, but chicken would be just fine if you eat chicken.
Market items: potatoes, carrots, turnips, basil, garlic, onion

The Eat Local Challenge: Eating Well at the Market, On a Budget

Throughout September, the central Illinois chapter of Buy Fresh Buy Local is hosting the Eat Local challenge.  The challenge is to spend $20 a week on locally grown food during the month of September. When Buy Fresh Buy Local asked us to collaborate on the Eat Local Challenge, Steph and I jumped at the chance to share some resources and ideas for eating well at the market without breaking the bank.

Deals at the Market: Buying in Bulk

September is an amazing time to get deals at the market. Vegetables like summer squashes, peppers, and tomatoes are nearing the end of their season but are still producing at a prolific rate. Traffic at the market also sometimes slows down, so farmers find themselves with a lot of produce that they are willing to sell in bulk, which is a boon to shoppers.

Keep your eyes peeled for signs that offer “two for one” bunches and “bulk” anything! The key is knowing which veggies are “bulk-ready” and using those items in your meal planning.

Prices on vegetables at the market can also change over time. According to Katie Bishop of PrairiErth Farm, when a crop first comes into season, there isn’t much of it but there is a lot of demand – think of those shoppers lined up for first-of-the summer tomatoes. Farmers may leverage this demand (that is, charge a little more). After a few weeks, they will drop the price because the supply is so much greater and they need to sell it. Tomatoes that were $4 per pound in July are now $3.25 in September – and they are probably available for far less if you’re buying in bulk. (Click here and here for ideas on preserving bulk tomatoes for later use.)

Potatoes also tend to cost less as the season goes on. “New” potatoes must be hand-dug and washed, says Katie Bishop. It takes a lot of hands-on labor to get those beautiful spuds out of the ground. But potatoes in October are mechanically harvested and machined washed. There is less work for the farm, so they can drop the price. (And who doesn’t love potatoes?!)

Ask For Seconds

Most farmers put only their most beautiful products out at the market – but they’ve probably got a few bins in the truck that hold less-than-perfect but still perfectly edible items. Farmers would far prefer to sell those items than to compost them (especially if they don’t have to haul it back to the farm). Ask your favorite farmer if they can offer any deep discounts on these veggies. With a few extra minutes of prep (to cut off bad spots, for instance), you’ve saved a lot of money but still ended up with great food.

One great item to ask about is carrots. “Juice carrots” might not look beautiful but can be pureed, juiced, peeled, shredded, etc. – and the taste is just as good as the cosmetically perfect carrots. Peppers are another item that can be incredibly cheap in bulk and as seconds (try cutting them up and freezing them in small amounts to use later in soups, a stir fry, or chili).  Peppers can also be roasted and frozen for a range of uses later.

Resources for Eating Locally On a Budget

Our blog focuses on easy meal preparation that features great, fresh, local food. For that reason, we love Lee Ann Brown’s Good and Cheap – a cookbook designed for families utilizing SNAP benefits (formerly known as good stamps). Shoppers can use the Illinois Link card to purchase items at The Downtown Bloomington Farmers’ Market every Saturday.

Good and Cheap is available at no cost here. Brown’s website is also fantastic, featuring an extensive recipe index and other great tips. Her recipes are for everyone who likes tasty food with easy prep!

Buy Pantry Staples in Bulk, Too! Other good things to buy (and cook/prep/freeze) in bulk include:

Both Green Top Grocery and Common Ground Natural Grocery in Bloomington have extensive bulk selections. (Green Top is a cooperative grocery, and is owned by members – and anyone can shop there, no membership needed.) We’ve got some great ideas on prepping and freezing in earlier blog posts, too. (More tips on buying in bulk here.)

Recipes for the Eat Local Challenge

You might be surprised how far you can make $20 go at the market. We are also happy to feature a number of recipes from Good and Cheap below.

Five Days of Breakfast:

Lunches and Dinners:

Did you accept the Eat Local Challenge? We would love to hear from you.

Have a great week, and see you at the market!

 

 

 

Market Menu: September 16

by flickr user simpleprovisions

While there’s plenty of grain, flowers, lavender, meat and other produce at the market, the theme of this week’s Market Menu focuses on all those hearty late-summer vegetables that we love to ROAST.

Pretty much everything you could ever want in your midwest farmer’s market is available right now, and it’s getting to be the last chance for some of the summer vegetables, so seize the opportunity! Gazpacho season is passing quickly. But personally, I’m excited to see all the winter squash and cooler-weather root vegetables, because they all take to roasting so well — and it’s such an easy way to enjoy fall flavors.

So instead of our usual breakfast / lunch / dinner arrangement, I’m going to separate this into some vegetable-specific groups that include roasting:

Carrots:

Winter Squash:

Turnips:

Sweet Potatoes:

Brussels Sprouts:

New Potatoes:

Beets:

What I really love to do with roasted veggies is use them throughout the week as the primary ingredient in Buddha Bowls. Along with homemade hummus or beans, some greens if they’re handy (even finely-chopped kale will work), and some brown rice or farro (or the grain of your choice), they make a really hearty lunch or dinner. If you want more protein, roast up some chicken or bake some tofu and add it to the bowls. A nice garlicky lemon-tahini dressing brings it all together nicely.

Roasted vegetables are also good for quick panini or doctored-up grilled cheese sandwiches. You can toast some nice hearty ciabatta or other bread (the Paesano loaf from Pekara would be amazing for this) and spread hummus and some warmed vegetables, or add the veg to a grilled cheese before putting the second piece of bread on. It’s the one place where I prefer provolone cheese to all else, but I’m sure others like gruyere would be amazing.