Market Menu: October 14

watermelon radishes!

I honestly can’t tell most days whether it’s supposed to be fall or still summer. The leaves are just starting to change, the root vegetables are ABUNDANT, and occasionally there’s an actual chill in the air in central Illinois.

Since we’re wrapping back around, in a way, to some beginning-of-the-season offerings (greens, herbs, radishes), I thought I’d pull up selections from prior weeks. Do you have any favorites? We’d love to hear from you! Check out our Facebook page and message us!

Carrot salad w/ harissa & feta & mint

carrots

This dish is one of my favorites from Smitten Kitchen, and a great alternative to green salads when you have vegetarians to feed. It’s absolutely amazing when made with locally-grown carrots. If you haven’t had them raw, you’re in for a treat; they’re almost as surprising as a local tomato, I think. This recipe is great with or without the harissa — a spicy, garlic-y paste/spice mix. You can make your own, substitute it with another garlic-y chili paste, or just leave it out altogether.
Pantry Check / Shopping list: carrots, caraway seeds (optional), cumin seeds, paprika, harissa (optional), sugar, lemon, flat leaf parsley, fresh mint, feta cheese. 

 

 

 

 

 

Vegetable Frittata with Greens and Potato

eggsHere’s a base recipe for the frittata (from Epicurious).  To that base, add what you have! I like greens, herbs, potatoes, cheese, maybe some bacon or ground pork. If you have leftover roasted root veggies, chop them up (bite-sized) and add them as well; I think it actually works best when you have pre-cooked potatoes (or carrots or sweet potatoes)!

Pantry Check / Shopping List: chives, spinach or kale, eggs, potatoes, milk, sausage (optional), goat cheese (chevre).

Soups:

(Be sure to check out this post on soups generally)

Thai Carrot Sweet Potato Soup (Cookie and Kate, from the Oh She Glows Cookbook) – with red curry and peanut, lime and cilantro!!

Irish Carrot Soup (Food and Wine) – onion and potato, and lots of butter and cream

Polenta with Greens

So easy, though it does call for a lot of stirring. There are a lot of recipes out there for polenta with a braised or steamed green (try beet greens!). This recipe from Food.com has swiss chard and a topping with dried fruits and nuts, as well as cheese (which is a must for polenta, in my opinion).

 

Pantry Check / Shopping List: Swiss chard, crushed red pepper flakes, golden raisins, yellow cornmeal, milk, grated parmesan cheese, pine nuts.

Green Chickpea & Chicken Curry w/ Beet Greens

Green Chickpea & Chicken Curry w/… The recipe is written for swiss chard, but did you know that beet greens are like identical cousins? They’ll do very nicely in this recipe.
Pantry Check: chicken thighs, shallots, green curry paste, chili paste, ginger, coconut milk, chickpeas, greens

Extras:

Magic Sauce – From 101 Cookbooks, this stuff is like liquid gold… use it on eggs, pasta, potatoes, just about anything.
Pantry Check: fresh rosemary, fresh thyme, fresh oregano, paprika, garlic, bay leaves, red pepper flakes, lemon juice

 

 

Be sure to check out Jen’s post on beets — we can’t get enough of beets in my house, even though at least half of them end up pickled

Market Menu: September 30 – The EAT LOCAL Challenge!

Throughout September, the central Illinois chapter of Buy Fresh Buy Local is hosting the Eat Local challenge.  The challenge is to spend $20 a week on locally grown food during the month of September.

A week of meals based on $20 of local food? We’ve got this!

Five Days of Breakfast:

Carrot and apple smoothie – from Oprah.com
Market items: carrots, apples

Local oats (or wheat berries!) with your favorite toppings – from Epicurious. Oats are inexpensive and store easily, and it just might be chilly enough this weekend for a hot breakfast. The next time I make oatmeal, I’m going to try adding in some of my homemade applesauce — which is basically just chopped up apples left in a crock pot until they’re soft.
Market items: Oats! 

Crispy egg on toast – from Smitten Kitchen
Market items: eggs, bread

Scrambled tofu with greens – from Yup it’s Vegan. This is a great way to incorporate vegetables in your breakfast, if that’s a thing you want to do. You can also add in leftover roasted vegetables – sweet potatoes are delicious in a breakfast scramble, too.
Market items: greens!

Freezer-friendly breakfast burritos – from The Kitchn
Market items: eggs, potatoes, peppers, bacon or sausage

 

Five days of Lunches

Carrot Salad – This is a fantastic grated carrot salad with parsley and lemon, from Once Upon a Chef. While not a meal on its own, it would go well with some cheese and fruit and/or another assortment of things.  I’d put money on this going well with feta cheese, in particular. 
Market items: 
carrots, parsley, cheese, apples

The Peppers and Sausages below make great leftovers, if you chop up the sausages before packing into individual serving containers. Add some rice or bread for a hearty lunch.

My favorite and most reliable lunch these days is chicken and sweet potatoes and applesauce. We’re in the heart of sweet potato season now, so I suggest that you stock up. I like to peel and cut my sweet potatoes into large chunks and boil them (and then mash), or else cut in small-medium (1/2″) cubes and roast. I’ll bake the chicken with a glug of italian dressing and foil over the baking dish, and then retain some of the liquid that remains after cooking (otherwise the chicken can get dry). If you’re going to chop the chicken up after cooking, be sure to let it rest first — otherwise, you’ll definitely have dry chicken.

 

Five days of Dinners

Spicy Stuffed Cabbage Rolls – filled with rice, spicy pork, and fresh napa cabbage. Made by the Serious Eats folks, in their “Cook the Book” series, from Faith Durand’s Not Your Mother’s Casseroles. As the Serious Eats staff note, the filling can easily be customized for your family’s tastes:  less or more spicy, different vegetables, substituting ground beef for pork, etc.
Market items: Ground pork

Peppers and Sausages – done in the slow cooker, to serve in a bun or over rice.

The recipe is dead simple, and takes only 10 minutes in the morning.  Slice the peppers and onion (I’d probably do this the night before, and wrap gently – who wants to go to work with onion hands? not I!). Then you add whole-grain mustard and beer, and put the whole sausages on top, and let it cook for the day.

Not only has the weather turned perfectly just in time for hot dinners, but this has been an AMAZING season for peppers! Just check out these beauties at the market!!
Market items: Peppers, onions, sausages

 

 

Sheet Pan Chicken Thighs and Cabbage – from Food52. This calls for a head of green cabbage, and chicken thighs or drumsticks, and a simple quick marinade of sesame oil, soy sauce, vinegar, sriracha and salt and pepper. The cabbage goes in later – this is the key with sheet pan dinners, is getting the timing right. If you haven’t roasted cabbage or brussels sprouts before, you’re in for a treat. If it were me, I’d make some mashed potatoes to go along with this hearty dinner.
Market items: cabbage, chicken, potatoes

Roasted Root Vegetables and Hummus – if you’ve ever felt like making a dinner of appetizers, then this is your recipe. A combination of roasted vegetable chips and three different hummus recipes, to which I’d add some cooked quinoa and roasted broccoli, and maybe a hard-boiled egg. Some crusty bread, maybe.
Market items: beets, turnips, radishes, broccoli, eggs, bread

Vegetable Mulligatawny Soup – I adore this recipe from Madhur Jaffrey’s World Vegetarian. I’m not a vegetarian, but I make this at least once every fall, with an array of local vegetables. It calls for a long list of vegetables, but a small quantity of each: potatoes, carrots, turnips, basil, garlic, onion, plus fennel, cumin, coriander and peppercorns that you dry-roast in a pan and then grind fresh. It calls for vegetable stock, but chicken would be just fine if you eat chicken.
Market items: potatoes, carrots, turnips, basil, garlic, onion

Planning Ahead – Locally

For many of us (your co-authors included!!), it’s just about that time of year when the academic calendar takes over our lives again. Or at least for a little while, until we regain our balance. Having some food prepped for the coming week helps to take a little pressure off at the beginning of the term.

Whether it’s you or your kids or spouse who are headed back to school, check out some of our ideas below for prepped meals to help you out. And if no one in your house is headed back to school, then I hope you’ll relish your continued summer and this lovely weather!

Stuffed Bell Peppers

I’ve wanted to try making stuffed bell peppers for a while now. The peppers in our CSA basket this week were gigantic, so it was a great time to try! My sister was game and offered the use of her kitchen, so we each made a big batch to freeze.

Sometimes I don’t feel like following a specific recipe, so this is more a report on how I made them. I kept track of the ingredients in case you want to try replicating it, though!

the peppers. Between the CSA and market, I had 10 giant peppers to stuff!  I sliced off the tops, pulled out the core and gently removed the white ribs with my fingers. I diced up the good parts of the tops to add to the filling, since I wasn’t putting the tops back on after stuffing. And because I was going to freeze these, I decided to blanch the peppers first. I only put them into the boiling water for a minute, but I’d probably follow this chart (which recommends 3 minutes for peppers) next time. After blanching and draining, I set them in small foil loaf pans in pairs, to get ready for assembly. tip: spring-loaded grabbers are quite handy for dunking and removing the peppers without getting burned.

the meat. I figured a pound of ground beef was enough, and though it was sufficient, twice that would have been better. Cook the meat thoroughly in a skillet and drain the fat from the pan.

the filling. Make a pot of brown rice — 2 c. rice, 4 c. water. Set that aside in a large bowl once it’s done and cooled. In a large skillet, sautee a diced yellow onion and the diced pepper-tops together with a little olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. Add this to the rice, and mix well.

assembly. You can mix the ground beef into the rice mixture if you like, but honestly I wasn’t sure the rice was all going to fit, and I wanted to be sure that all the meat made it in. So ground beef went into the peppers first, then the rice mixture. The foil containers had thin plastic lids, so I used those for now. But once they’re frozen, I’ll take the covers off and put them in foodsaver bags, since the covers aren’t very sturdy for keeping in the deep freezer.

For what it’s worth, my sister used 2# of ground beef for her batch of 6 peppers, and she added a large can each of black beans and crushed tomatoes to her rice-meat-peppers-onions mixture. It made more than would fit into her peppers, so she just put those portions in their own containers.

small laundry baskets make great (washable!) containers for transport!

nutritional info. As made above, with 1 Tbs. of canola oil (to cook the diced peppers and onion), and with 2 stuffed peppers counting as a serving, these have approximately 384 calories, 20g protein,
25g carbs, 17g fat
(using CalorieKing.com).

They’re quite large, so add a bit of cheese and you have a pretty hearty meal!

 

 


Breakfast Bowls

I’ve made some version of these many times over, and the potential for variation is great — you can customize them for whatever flavors you like. Maple pork sausage with eggs and shredded potato is a particular favorite in my house.

Another thing your co-authors share is a significant daily work commute, and the ability to pop a breakfast in the microwave and eat it on the road or once I get to my office is a huge plus. I’ve made sandwiches and burritos before, but they’re hard to put down and pick up again. I find a bowl and spoon is actually easier to manage without spilling.

The batch that I made today was designed to be pretty heavy on the protein. I use 2 c. glass containers with lids from Anchor that do well from freezer to microwave, and this recipe stuffs them pretty full.

Ingredients:

2 dozen eggs
2 dozen egg whites (or the equivalent)
3 9.6-oz packages of turkey sausage crumbles
1 1/2 c. brown rice
olive oil spray

Cook the rice with 3 c. water, and set aside.

2 dozen eggs + 2 dozen whites!

The eggs are going to be scrambled, so crack 1 dozen whole eggs and 1 dozen egg *whites into a blender jar, add about 3 Tbs. water, and blend until slightly foamy. Heat a large skillet (nonstick is best) and add a quick spray of olive oil. Scramble the eggs in batches — about 1-2 c. in each batch, depending on the size of your pan. I’ve tried doing the whole thing at once, and it’s kind of been a mess. Your mileage may vary, of course. Set the cooked eggs aside in a large bowl/pan. When the first dozen is done, crack your second dozen of whole eggs and whites, and repeat the process.

Using pre-cooked turkey sausage feels a bit like cheating, and I’d rather not do it. But it is a huge time-saver. I need to seek out some local turkey that I can get ground, though; I’d love to try making my own turkey sausage, and cooking it at home.

12 breakfasts!

Assemble the bowls in layers: rice first, then meat, then eggs. I use a measuring cup for the rice (1/4 c. each), and weigh the other ingredients for each bowl.

To figure out the nutritional information for the eggs, I used the total number of eggs and whites — but knowing that number doesn’t help with portioning! So I divided the total weight of the cooked eggs (we found a pan that would fit on the kitchen scale!), and divided by 12 to get the weight we’d need for each bowl. It sounds like a hassle, but it actually goes pretty quickly.

nutritional information:
Using only cooking spray for the eggs, and no other added fat, these have approximately 316 calories, 34g protein, 14g carbs, and 15.8g fat. I was going to add cheese, but they’re stuffed into the bowls already!

These actually come together pretty quickly, and you can cook the components ahead of time. Straight from the freezer, these take a little more than 2 minutes in my microwave to heat fully. Friends have asked about the consistency of the egg, and honestly I don’t mind it. If anything, I slightly undercook the egg when I’m scrambling, since they’ll get cooked some more in the microwave. But they’re definitely better than the texture of egg in most drive-through breakfast sandwiches.

 

*If you’re going to separate your eggs, you might be wondering what to do with all those yolks.  Might I suggest making some salt-cured egg yolks? I’ve heard excellent things from friends, though I haven’t made them yet myself. You gently place the yolks in a little well of a salt-sugar mixture, and cover with more of the mix. For 5 days, they sit in your refrigerator, presumably releasing a lot of water into the salt mixture, and maybe taking in some sugar? After 5 days, you brush them off and dry in a 175F oven (or a dehydrator) for a couple of hours. Then, grate on pasta or toast. If you try it, be sure to report back!!

Market Menu: July 29!

What to make when you have EVERYTHING available at the market? It’s almost hard to choose!!

Breakfasts:

I’m partial to toast and jam or steel-cut oats and peanut butter, but eggs are always a delicious breakfast option.

How to Poach an Egg, by a self-described terrible egg poacher – Smitten kitchen
Worth a read/try. I won’t swear by any method, as I am also a terrible egg poacher, but when you get it right, it’s so rewarding.

Muesli / Refrigerator Oats – Epicurious
I know this has been going around Pinterest for a while, but I can’t think of a better time of year to give it a try. No need to put anything on the stove, not even a pot of water. Check out the Ackermans at the market for local oats, and the Food Forest in Normal is bursting with berries that you can add as-is, or make into preserves.

Radish and Turnip Hash – The Kitchn
If you still have turnips taking up space in your produce drawer, (I do!), here’s a good and tasty way to use them up.

Lunches:

I found these at the grocery store last week while shopping for lunches and snacks for my office while absolutely HANGRY.

I was intrigued! Veggies I hadn’t thought to put together, chopped and raw, with just a small packet of salsa and some cheese, and you microwave them to soften and mix. They weren’t bad! But there’s no reason I can’t make these at home, since they involve no pre-cooking at all.

 

My version of the southwest nourish bowls is below. This made 7 portions, and I plan to add some chicken to them for lunches.

Ingredients:
1 sweet potato, diced
1 kohlrabi, diced
1/2 yellow onion, diced
1 bunch kale, chopped medium-fine
1 medium zucchini, chopped
1 jar (about 2 c.) corn & black bean salsa

You could also add egg or meat or tvp, for more protein (I brought some cheese to add to this one).

 

Other easy, packable lunches include:

Smashed Chickpea Salad – from ‘wichcraft, via Smitten Kitchen
Great on toasted bread, but untoasted would also work in a pinch, especially if you have something crusty like a baguette.

Hummus with Tomato and Cucumber – Smitten Kitchen
If you’re in the market for some pita bread to go with the hummus (and the dip below), check out local baker Chad Sanders’ pita at the Garlic Press or the Downtown Bloomington market — delicious!!

Smoky Eggplant dip – from David Liebovitz, via Smitten Kitchen
I like to do the eggplant on the grill, whole but with slots cut in the outside to stuff whole cloves of garlic into. Throw it on the grill after your meal has cooked, but before you turn the gas off. Leave it while you’re eating, just check on it before you reach for that second bratwurst. When it’s all wrinkly like this, blackened in a few areas, you’ll know it’s done. Set aside until it’s cool. Really — don’t try to handle it until at least after dessert and you’ve played a couple board games or watched a good movie. Scoop out the insides, and proceed with the recipe as written. I feel pretty confident you’ll thank me for the grill+garlic tip. It’s that good — and a totally different way to enjoy eggplant.

Add grilled chicken to any or all of the above, and you have a pretty flavorful lunchbox!

 

Dinners:

I’ve been making a lot of zoodles lately. Well, they’re almost zoodles… but really just thin-sliced zucchini, since I don’t own a spiralizer. Just saute them in a pan with some olive oil and pesto or tomato sauce (or even just some small tomatoes!) until they’re softened, then add some parmesan cheese on top when serving. Cook them like vegetables, but flavor-wise, treat them like pasta. Very tasty, one-pot, and not too time-consuming.

There’s another zucchini-reliant dish I’ve been meaning to try for literally YEARS. I don’t know why I keep putting it off, but as soon as I get my hands on more squash, I’m making New Mexico-style Calabacitas. It’s a summer squash-corn saute with a little tomato, green chiles, cream and cheese. It’s mostly veg; the recipe above calls for 2# of squash and 2 c. of corn, and just 2 T butter, 1/4 c. half and half, and 1 c. grated cheese (both of which are optional).

With all the giant heirloom tomatoes available now, I’m planning to try this caprese quinoa casserole from Delish very soon. It makes use of lots of tomatoes and basil, garlic and shallots, and only takes a few more ingredients (quinoa, mozzarella, and balsamic vinegar). I grew up on cheeseburger pies, and I like that this is a sort of refined version of that. Though now I’m thinking about cheeseburger pie, and if you want to try it, here’s one from Chowhound that looks easy; and one from Food.com that looks like what my mom made (though we used shelf-stable pie crust sticks, which maybe don’t exist anymore? I haven’t seen them in ages). With all the local beef available here, and the broad customizability of this recipe, I should put these recipes into more of a regular rotation, I think!

Week 8: Market Menu

Are we really two months into market season? It’s been a great one so far: beautiful spring greens are about to give way to the veggies that come with the heat of mid-summer. Are you ready? Yeah – we are, too!

So what’s new this week at the market? TOMATOES! We should start seeing early-season tomatoes coming, though getting some is probably going to require your showing up in time for the starting bell. I heard a rumor that, last week, one farmer brought a small number of her first tomatoes to the market and (thoughtfully) rationed them to one per customer to an eager line of tomato-lovers. That’s the kind of pent-up demand for “real” tomatoes you see in June at the market!

Here’s a question that farmers at the market get a lot: what makes a vegetable an “heirloom” variety?

Commercial tomatoes sold in most grocery stores have been grown from plants that were developed to withstand cross-country shipping and distribution. In short, they are bred for durability rather than taste. Heirloom tomatoes are often very delicate, come in a range of colors (even striped!) and have distinctive flavor profiles.

In season in June: Green beans, cabbage, broccoli, carrots, lettuce, cucumber, spinach, squash, potatoes...

Breakfast Ideas:

Hot outside? A cucumber-pineapple smoothie is going to be a nice way to keep cool.

If you’re one of the lucky shoppers who got the prized early tomatoes, slice one up and enjoy it with a crispy egg and whole grain toast from one of our market bakers. (What? You’re not doing the crispy egg? My friend, we have to talk.)

Enjoy some berries from Normal’s amazing Refuge Food Forest over yogurt and homemade granola (way easier than you think!). (Feeling adventurous? Consider making your own yogurt – both Common Ground Grocery and Green Top Grocery carry Kilgus Farms dairy milk. It is way easier than you think!)

Lunch Ideas:

This is the time of year when I start to keep a bowl of cucumber salad in the fridge at all times. I keep making it, and we keep eating it. I usually don’t do much beyond slicing cucs, putting them in a bowl with enough water to cover, and add a bit of vinegar and sugar (a teaspoon or two each) until I like the balance (here is a recipe for something very similar). My grandmother made them this way, and also sometimes with sour cream. Like many salads, there are wonderful variations on this theme across a world of cuisines, which should keep you from getting bored of cucumbers for quite some time.

You might pair this with a healthy and hearty lentil salad or chick pea salad. In our household, we try to cook extra proteins over the weekend if we are grilling so we can add leftovers to salads, too.

Caprese salads have become a summer standby – grab some basil and fresh mozzarella to go with your farm fresh tomatoes and you’re in business.

Other salad ideas for lunch or dinner: broccoli salad (again, so many variations here). My version includes a slightly sweet dressing (yogurt, vinegar or lemon juice, a teaspoon of sugar) and sometimes raisins, apples, and/or carrots.

And I adore this lemon tahini kale salad from the Good Health Gourmet (gluten-free friends, check out this blog – wonderful recipes and gorgeous photos!).

Dinner Ideas:

Summer can mean that meals get a lot simpler. I’m always looking for shortcuts because I’m not eager to spend too much time on cooking (but I still want to eat well!). So…

Rotisserie chicken. Grilled hot dogs with chowchow, a southern condiment staple. We love our bratwurst in the midwest – how about some homemade sauerkraut? (Here is one thing I don’t mind spending time on: a good meatless burger. Impress your vegetarian friends this summer.)

Here’s a great tip: get some really great bread and grill it when it starts to get a little stale and you need to use it up.

I had some great local bread from Chad at The Garlic Press and it was a few days old. My parents were visiting and my mom sliced it, and grilled it in a pan with a bit of canola oil (olive oil is too delicate for this) and sprinkled sea salt. It was phenomenal. (Evidence is to your left.) We ate it with pasta and a salad and it might have been the best part of a fantastic meal.

Happy marketing and bon appetit! – J.S

 

 

 

Week 6 Market Menu: Cukes and Zukes, or Cucurbit Time!

Welcome the Cucurbits! These are among my favorite summer vegetables. With the exception of tomatoes, I think it’s what I look forward to the most. Even zucchini 🙂

Seasonal: Greens: Arugula, Dandelion, LOTS of Lettuces, Mustard, Swiss Chard, and Spinach.  Brassicas: Kale, Collards, Cabbage, Kohlrabi.  Cucurbits: Cucumbers and Zucchini!  Root Veg: Beets, Carrots, Potatoes, Radishes, and Turnips. Also green onions, green garlic and garlic scapes. Herbs: Basil, Chives, Cilantro, Dill, Mint, Oregano, Sage, Thyme.    Fruit:  Strawberries!!!!

All Summer: Eggs, chicken, beef, oats, wheat, cornmeal, pork, cheese, honey, baked goods, lavender, mushrooms, popcorn, and much more. See the complete list of vendors at this year’s market for more information about produce and products.

 

Fun fact about Swiss Chard: it’s actually a variety of beet! The varieties we cook and pickle has been bred for its roots, and the varieties whose leaves we chop and lightly cook have been bred for their large leaves! The greens from your beet roots are also tasty.

This week, it looks like we’re back to pretty warm weather… so crock pot and no-cook and leftovers galore are my plans for meals.

Breakfast Ideas:
I’ve been loving Chad Sanders’ sesame bagels for breakfast, toasted, with a little salted butter and a little fresh ground peanut butter. So delicious! Add a hard-boiled egg and maybe some fresh strawberries, and that’s a lovely breakfast!

Here’s a frittata recipe that features fresh cilantro and pretty much whatever you have in your fridge. When I first saw the picture, I thought the thin pink slices were sausage, and now I’m totally imagining making this with some local pork brats or crumbled sausage. And swiss chard or beet greens.

Frittatas used to intimidate me, I’ll be honest. Putting it all together and then just trusting that the eggs would be done made me nervous. But once I tried it, it became a regular in our easy-dinner rotation, not to mention brunch. I like using a well-seasoned cast-iron skillet for this; the iron heats evenly, and cooks the inside of the eggs without burning the bottom.

Lunch Ideas:

Pickled Cucumber Soup – Ottolenghi

Some cucumber-heavy dishes from Smitten Kitchen:

And two from Food and Wine:

Zucchini Agrodolce – 101 Cookbooks (if ever there was a zucchini recipe to get me excited about zucchini, this is it!! honey, garlic, evoo, walnuts and dates!)

Dinner Ideas:

Slow-Cooker Tacos! Start with your meat, choose flour or corn tortillas, and then a variety of vegetables! A few options for meat:

Other Taco ingredients:

Or.., try this Food and Wine recipe that uses a rotisserie chicken to cut down on cooking!

Week 5 Market Menu: Summer is Coming!

This week at the Downtown Bloomington Farmers’ Market and Artists’ Alley:

Seasonal: Greens: Arugula, LOTS of Lettuces, Kale, Swiss Chard, Spinach and Collard Greens!  Root Veg: Beets, Carrots, Potatoes, Radishes, and Turnips.  Summer squashes, including Zucchini!!  Herbs: Cilantro, Dill, Mint.  Kohlrabi and Cabbage!  And Strawberries!!!!

All Summer: Eggs, chicken, beef, oats, wheat, cornmeal, pork, cheese, honey, baked goods, lavender, mushrooms, popcorn, and much more. See the complete list of vendors at this year’s market for more information about produce and products.

 

 

It’s a short one this week!!

Breakfast Ideas:

I’ve been starting to crave smoothies in the morning, now that it’s getting warmer. And it might be all in my head, but I do feel like greens in the morning help keep me awake and alert until lunch. A quick trip in the blender, pop it in a cup and I can hit the road with my breakfast, which is an extra plus for me. I usually wing it, as far as a recipe. I start with around 12 oz milk (almond or soy milk works, too!) and protein powder. Then, flavor!  Frozen bananas and a handful of kale is my go-to, but I also like kale with frozen peaches, or spinach and frozen mango and banana!  Citrus is a nice balance to the green. I use a regular blender, and just start with a handful of greens at first. Search “Green Smoothie” and you’ll find literally dozens of recipes/combinations. Check out this list from DailyBurn.com.

 

Lunch Ideas:

Last week, I mostly stuck to a bagel or crackers, some Little Bloom on the Prairie with a touch of honey, and a handful of greens for lunch. Add just a touch of good olive oil and a splash of your favorite flavored balsamic vinegar to the greens, and you’re good to go! Here are a few other ideas for enjoying local produce in your lunches this week:

  • Radishes with garlic scape butter – add some crackers and cheese, and you have lunch!
  • Roast chicken (whole or parts) w/ a little olive oil, cool, then break down and portion out
  • Wheat berries are delicious in salads!
  • Hard-boil some eggs over the weekend, and add them to your lunchboxes during the week

 

Dinner Ideas:

  • If you’re grilling burgers or brats, slice up some turnips (less than 1/4″ thick) and put the finished grilled meat on top of the slices. The heat (temperature) of the meat softens up the turnips and dulls the heat (bite!) of the turnip. For someone like me, who’s not accustomed to the flavor of turnips, it’s a nice way to enjoy their flavor without the spiciness.
  • Pasta salads are a lovely way to avoid having the stove on at dinnertime. You can cook the pasta the night before, and dress it with your favorites. This one with swiss chard and garlic scape pesto looks delicious. Green garlic or garlic scapes would be great, especially with a little lemon zest and radishes.
  • Did you remember to pull some meat out of the freezer for tomorrow’s dinner? I wish I could consistently remember to do that!
  • Double up on things that require the oven, like casseroles or roasted veggies or meat. Plan to have leftovers for dinner the next day! Something like this chicken and kale casserole, or this spinach and egg strata.
  • If you grill or roast veggies and have leftovers, and are wondering what to do with them, why not try a Buddha bowl? Just add some grain and your favorite things from your fridge, basically. It works. Surprisingly well.

 

 

Week 4 Market Menu: Better Late Than Never!

This week at the Downtown Bloomington Farmers’ Market and Artists’ Alley:

Seasonal: More greens, BEETS, more vegetable plants for your gardens! Arugula, Asparagus, Carrots, Chard, Collards, Kale, Mint, Potatoes, Radishes, Rhubarb, Spinach, Turnips, and more! And some STRAWBERRIES at Olive Berry Acres!

All Summer: Eggs, chicken, beef, oats, wheat, cornmeal, pork, cheese, honey, baked goods, lavender, mushrooms, popcorn, and much more. See the complete list of vendors at this year’s market for more information about produce and products.

This week and weekend got away from me in epic fashion, but as I get ready to prep some meals for the week, I’m pretty encouraged by what I see in my fridge:  arugula, turnips, carrots, chicken, eggs (including a duck egg from Above Normal!), lots of bok choy, bread from Pekara/Central IL Bakehouse, bacon from Huelskoetter Farms, some chevre, and a pretty good array of staples. Sounds like bacon and eggs for a couple of breakfasts (oatmeal for the rest), salads for lunches (with chicken or hard-boiled egg, and maybe some strawberries), egg salad with radish, a chicken stir-fry with the bok choy, and the carrot-feta salad I posted about in week 1.

 

Nothing fancy! Nothing too time-intensive, or that requires long hours in the kitchen over a hot stove.

Here are some additional notes/explanations/recipes:

  1. When it’s strawberry season, I love them on salads, but only with this poppyseed dressing. Arugula or other greens, strawberries, chopped carrot, maybe a little red onion, and that’s it. Add chicken if you want protein on the salad. A bit of chevre (soft goat cheese) wouldn’t hurt at all.
  2. Grain salads are very forgiving, and will happily accept your fridge full of fresh veg. I wouldn’t say I’m a fan of turnips, but I’m working on it. This farro and turnip salad, which uses the greens from the turnips as well, is one I’m looking forward to trying this week.
  3. We posted about roasting your bok choy last week, but I always enjoy it in a stir fry (which doesn’t have to take a long time on the stove!). This recipe from the NYT has you steam before adding them. It’s a pretty simple recipe, though: chicken broth, sherry, soy sauce, cornstarch, oil, garlic and ginger, sugar and sesame seeds.
  4. I’d like to try this radish and egg salad recipe this week (hold the sprouts).

In case anyone is wondering what to do with those whole oats at the market, I’ve been experimenting with different ways of cooking them. I like the nutty bit of a bite to them, but I also like a creamy sort of porridge. For me, that requires a short trip in the food processor or slightly longer time with the stick blender, to break open some of the berries. They don’t all have to be chopped, though. Just enough to let some starch out. Super tasty!

Week 2 Market Menu:

This week at the Downtown Bloomington Farmers’ Market and Artists’ Alley:

Seasonal: More greens, and lots of vegetable plants for your gardens! Arugula and Spinach and Collards and Chard and Kale, Carrots, Chives, Mint, Potatoes, Radishes, Rhubarb, Turnips, and more. And confirmed with at least one vendor that there will be asparagus!

All Summer: Eggs, chicken, beef, oats, wheat, cornmeal, pork, cheese, honey, baked goods, lavender, mushrooms, popcorn, and much more. See the complete list of vendors at this year’s market for more information about produce and products.

This week’s Market Menu:

The name of the game this week is “work with what you have!” We have a lot of turnips, so I’ve gathered several recipes to help us make salads with them. But if a recipe calls for something you don’t have, don’t worry! I substitute heavily when I cook, with a few notable exceptions:

  1. vinegar – try to use the same kind specified. If there’s one kind of vinegar I try never to run out of, though, it’s plain white.  At the very least, it won’t overpower a dish if you have to use it in place of apple cider vinegar or white wine vinegar. I’ve made the mistake in the past of keeping a deep pantry of balsamic, and then finding I was out of every other kind of vinegar.
  2. spices – omit something you don’t have, rather than substitute (or at least taste first!)
  3. butter/oil – follow your heart and taste buds here, but I like to use whatever the recipe calls for.

Breakfast Ideas:

Wheat Berries w/ dried fruit & nuts – New York Times
Pantry Check: Wheat Berries, optional spices (anise or fennel, cinnamon, nutmeg), raisins or other dried fruit, nuts, yogurt, brown sugar or maple syrup

 

Fried-and-Scrambled (aka Frambled) Eggs – Epicurious
Pantry Check: Eggs, Butter, optional add-ins (sausage, greens)

 

Lunch Ideas:

Salad w/ New Potatoes and Pickled Spring Onions – Smitten Kitchen
Pantry Check: new/fingerling potatoes, asparagus, spring peas or beans (optional), radishes, spring onions, white wine vinegar, whole-grain mustard, smooth dijon mustard

Your Custom Salad: Green, Big, and Single-Subject Salad, and Dressings! – New York Times, “How to Make Salad”. I plan to make several versions of this throughout the week, using whatever greens I grab at the market. Arugula for sure.
Pantry Check: whatever looks good to you!!

Turnip and Cabbage Slaw with Yogurt Dressing – New York Times, “In Praise of Turnips, Year-Round”
Pantry Check: turnips, green cabbage, greek yogurt, dill

Shaved Turnip and Radish Salad with Poppyseed Dressing – Splendid Table
Pantry Check: lemon, Dijon mustard, shallot, poppy seeds, honey or maple syrup, turnips, watercress, radishes, asparagus, chives

Dinner Ideas:

Swiss Chard Pancakes – Smitten Kitchen
Pantry Check: milk, AP Flour, eggs, onion, chives, shallot, garlic, parsley, chard, yogurt (optional)

Creamed Chard and Spring Onions – Smitten Kitchen
Pantry Check: swiss chard, onions, butter, AP flour, milk

Green Chickpea & Chicken Curry w/ Swiss Chard – The Crepes of Wrath (apologies in advance for that page being VERY heavy with photos. It takes forever to load completely on the iPad I use in the kitchen, but I promise the recipe is worth it!)
Pantry Check: chicken thighs, shallots, green curry paste, chili paste, ginger, coconut milk, chickpeas, swiss chard

Kale Puree (which you can use in nearly anything) – Edible Manhattan (they suggest using it in a polenta, but I love it as an alternative to tomato sauce on pasta)
Pantry Check: garlic, kale, sea salt (Maldon, ideally), extra-virgin olive oil. That’s it, really!

 

Bonus: Maple-Butter Collard Greens!  This is my favorite way to enjoy collards, and doesn’t require anything you don’t probably already have in your pantry. If you haven’t tried them before, give this recipe a shot! Chop collards roughly and discard stems. Slice a yellow onion and cook over medium heat in a large pan with a little olive oil until they start to caramelize. Add your collards and a splash of water — you want enough water to keep the collards from burning in a dry pan, but not so much that you’re boiling or braising them. Continue cooking over medium heat for about 15 minutes. When greens are tender, set the greens aside in a bowl and wipe out the pan. Add the following to the pan over medium-high heat:  2 Tbs butter, 1 Tbs apple cider vinegar, 1 Tbs maple syrup (the real stuff!). Cook while stirring, until the combined and slightly reduced to make a sauce. You can either put this on the table in a small gravy pitcher, or toss the collards in the pan with the sauce before serving. This makes 2-3 servings of sauce, but you may want more.
Pantry Check: apple cider vinegar, butter, maple syrup (REAL maple syrup!)

Extra-Bonus: Magic Sauce – 101 Cookbooks (this stuff is like liquid gold… use it on eggs, pasta, potatoes, just about anything)
Pantry Check: fresh rosemary, fresh thyme, fresh oregano, paprika, garlic, bay leaves, red pepper flakes, lemon juice

 

Week 1 Market Menu: Greens!

Every week in this section, we’ll bring you a preview of what’s expected at the market (depending on availability), and a set of links to recipes that feature seasonal produce, with ingredients to help guide your market and other shopping.
This week marks the start of outdoor market season, as well as the opening of our brand new co-op, Green Top Grocery! I hope you’re as excited as we are about this new opportunity to shop for locally-grown produce, in addition to Common Ground grocery in downtown Bloomington.
lettuce-farm

Expected Offerings at Market Week 1:

Seasonal:  Greens, greens, greens!  Arugula and Spinach and Kale, Carrots, Chives, Mint, Potatoes, Radishes, Rhubarb, Turnips, and more. And maybe, just maybe, some asparagus.
All summer: Eggs, chicken, beef, oats, wheat, cornmeal, pork, cheese, honey, baked goods, and much more. See the complete list of vendors at this year’s market for more information.
A note about the recipes that follow: they were selected to make use of seasonal local products, with room to alter them to fit your family’s needs. This week features vegetarian recipes, but suggestions for meat additions will be included as well. In the shopping lists that appear below each recipe, we’ll assume that you have the following in your pantry:  Garlic, Olive Oil, Salt and Pepper. Click over to the recipe at its source for complete lists with amounts (and instructions).

Breakfast Ideas:

Steel-Cut Oats or Whole Oats

 
No matter the weather, I can always eat steel-cut oats for breakfast. You can cook them the night before and then reheat in the morning, set up in the crock pot overnight, or just cook them in the morning (if you have an hour or so). Alton Brown’s recipe is deliciously rich (containing butter, milk, and buttermilk!). Bob’s Red Mill version is simply oats and water. I like a ratio of 1:3 or 1:4,  1/2 c. oats, 1 1/2 c. water, and 1/2 c. milk (added at the end, so that it doesn’t boil for too long). Very recently, I’ve started adding peanut butter — the fresh-ground kind, which you can grind yourself at Green Top. Optional additions include maple syrup or honey, nuts and/or dried fruit, or preserves. (If you have any fruit left in your freezer from last season, this is a good time to get it out and make some quick refrigerator preserves!).  Note: if your oats are whole, rather than cut, you can cook them in that form, too. To release a bit of the starch and make the finished oatmeal more creamy, just pulse them in the food processor a few times.
1/2 c. dry oats will serve 2, with each serving containing 152 calories, 6.6g protein, 26g carbs, 2.7g fat (oats-only).
Pantry Check / Shopping List: steel-cut or whole oats, milk (optional), optional additions.

Lunch Ideas:

How do you like your lunch routine? It’s easy to get stuck in a lunch rut during the long midwestern winter, but spring greens give you dozens of options. This week, I plan to make four different “salads” (to use the term loosely). There’s no reason you can’t make these for dinners, of course, but the one thing they all have in common is that they can be prepped and stored for a few days, and taste just as good.

Kale Salad with Wheat Berries and Tofu

kale1
Curly Kale

I really like this Mighty Grain Salad recipe from The First Mess (via Happyolks) as a base for grain salads. It’s flexible enough to make with what you have on hand, but delicious made exactly as written, too.

 

wheatberries
wheat berries

This week, I’m planning to use winter wheat berries for the grain in the recipe.  If you haven’t eaten wheat berries before, you’re in for a treat! They’re nutty and chewy and a little sweet, and available straight from local farmers at the market. Wheat berries can take up to an hour to cook, but they can be cooked in advance and frozen; just make sure to drain them well before freezing.  I’ll use carrots and broccoli for the veg, plus chickpeas, curly kale, parsley, sunflower seeds, and cubed firm tofu, with lemon juice for the acid and just a touch of olive oil. If you wanted to add more protein to your meal, add your favorite meat on the side; roasted or baked chicken breast would be delicious with this.


 

Tip: if you have a food processor, try shredding the carrots with the grater attachment, then switching to the chopping blade. Pulse a few times, until crumbly.  Dump the carrots into a large bowl, and add rough-chopped broccoli into the processor bowl.  Pulse a few times, until the texture is similar. The image at the right is a simplified version of this food-processor salad, using only carrots and broccoli with lemon juice (hemp hearts optional). It’s super tasty, and keeps incredibly well through the week. 

Pantry Check / Shopping List: winter wheat berries, carrots, broccoli, chickpeas, kale, parsley, sunflower seeds, firm tofu.


Carrot salad w/ harissa & feta & mint

carrots
Carrots with tops — which you can use to make a very interesting pesto!

This dish is one of my favorites from Smitten Kitchen, and a great alternative to green salads when you have vegetarians to feed. It’s absolutely amazing when made with locally-grown carrots!! And it’s good with or without the harissa — a spicy, garlic-y paste/spice mix. You can make your own, substitute it with another garlic-y chili paste, or just leave it out altogether — the salad will still be delicious!
Pantry Check / Shopping list: carrots, caraway seeds (optional), cumin seeds, paprika, harissa (optional), sugar, lemon, flat leaf parsley, fresh mint, feta cheese. 


HB Eggs / Egg Salad Sandwiches with Radish Salad

radish1
radishes w/ tops

I’ve been eyeing this Radish and Herb Salad with Meyer Lemon Dressing for a while, and it’s the first thing I want to make now that we’ve finally arrived at radish season! I love the combination of rich egg salad with the dry bite of a good radish. You could add some sliced radishes to your sandwich and not bother with the salad at all, if you want to keep it simple. The meyer lemon is lovely, but I think regular lemons are just fine in this recipe. You could also use orange juice.
Pantry Check / Shopping list: fresh crusty bread, white wine vinegar, celery, eggs, whole-grain dijon, mayonnaise, shallots, lemon, parsley, radishes, fennel, capers.


Kale Salad with Sweet Potato and Black Beans

kale3
Lacinato (aka dinosaur) Kale

This hearty “salad” comes from Cookie and Kate. I say “salad” because it’s nothing like a traditional green salad with dressing; it’s greens and grains, roots and beans, and the dressing is tailor-made for it (and easy to make!) All the ingredients are things I tend to have in my pantry, or can easily substitute or omit. It’s great when made with kale, but you can use spinach or another green if you prefer. The quinoa is quick to cook, but you could use rice or another grain here, too. I’ve often made this with homemade hummus instead of the avocado sauce (since buying avocados in the midwest is a bit like playing roulette). The cumin-paprika-coriander and cilantro-lime are deliciously compatible flavors, so I don’t usually mess around with those too much, but otherwise feel free to experiment!!
Pantry Check / Shopping List: quinoa, kale, lime, sweet potatoes, cumin, paprika, avocado, jalapeno, cilantro, coriander, black beans, feta cheese, pepitas (green pumpkin seeds).

 


Dinner Ideas:

Green Rice

spinach

This recipe is the result of a mistake that I decided to run with. It’s super tasty if you love spinach, and might even be tasty if you don’t love spinach (yet!).  The spinach is blended into a sort of sauce, which is added to rice as it cooks. So if your dislike of spinach is based on the texture, rather than flavor, this may be the perfect recipe for you (and perhaps your kids). The original recipe was the green rice portion of these sweet potato bowls. My mistake is that I used about 3x as much spinach I was supposed to, but I loved the results. I now make it as the base of a buddha bowl, or to serve alongside grilled meat or fish or baked tofu. I’ve also tried it topped with feta and sunflower seeds for a sort of one-pot / stovetop version of Mollie Katzen’s Spinach Rice Casserole.

Pantry Check / Shopping List: brown rice, vegetable broth, spinach, cilantro, jalapeno or serrano pepper (optional), shallot, plus whatever you’re serving the rice with.


Vegetable Frittata with Greens and Potato

eggsUsing a base recipe for the frittata (we’re a fan of base recipes here!), I’m going to use fresh kale, chives and potatoes, and some fresh goat cheese if I can find it this week! Add some meat, if you like; fresh pork sausage would be delicious. If you’ve never made a frittata before, never fear! The Epicurious recipe linked above is easy to follow and gives you a blank slate for all sorts of add-ins.

Pantry Check / Shopping List: chives, spinach or kale, eggs, potatoes, milk, sausage (optional), goat cheese (chevre).


Polenta with Greens

Polenta is cornmeal which has been boiled, giving it the creamy texture of hot cereal. It may be served hot as a porridge, or cooled and sliced and then fried.  This recipe from Food.com uses it in its porridge form, adds swiss chard and a topping with dried fruits and nuts, as well as cheese. I plan to make it exactly as written, as it’s simple and quick! Note that you can use the same type of greens as in the salad above, if you want to get double-duty out of them.
Pantry Check / Shopping List: Swiss chard, crushed red pepper flakes, golden raisins, yellow cornmeal, milk, grated parmesan cheese, pine nuts.


Bow Tie Pasta w/ Arugula Gremolata

I love this recipe from Mollie Katzen of the Moosewood restaurant and cookbooks. A gremolata is a chopped-herb topping usually consisting of lemon, garlic, and parsley. This version uses arugula instead, and it’s a delicious way to get the peppery flavor of young arugula. I’ve come to think of this recipe as soon as I see arugula in the spring, it’s so simple and tasty. Best of all, it works as a hot dish or as a cold salad making for excellent leftovers!
Pantry Check / Shopping List: bow-tie pasta, gorgonzola cheese, golden raisins (regular raisins are fine), cherry tomatoes (I omit until we get local tomatoes!), walnuts, arugula, lemon zest.


Bonus:

Creamy Asparagus Soup

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Asparagus season is nearly behind us, but I wanted to include this recipe in case you come across any more. It’s my attempt at a very light curry flavor, without losing the delicious asparagus flavor. It’s a simple, quick soup to make, and can easily be made vegan: just substitute coconut oil for the butter.
Ingredients:
3 Tbs. butter
1 shallot, sliced
2 1/2 # asparagus, chopped into 1/2″ – 1″ lengths (remove tough ends first)
pinch of salt
1 14oz can coconut milk
1/2 c. water
1/2 tsp ground coriander
1/4 tsp cumin
1/2 c. chopped fresh cilantro
1/4 tsp lemon zest
1 tsp lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste
Instructions:
Heat butter in a large skillet or heavy-bottomed pot until it starts to bubble a bit. Saute the shallots for 1-2 minutes, until they soften. Add the asparagus and a pinch of salt, and cook about 5 minutes, until they turn bright green and are tender. Turn off the heat and put the asparagus and shallots into your blender. Add the coconut milk — be sure to use the canned stuff, not the cartons sold for drinking. They’re two very different things! You can use the low- or full-fat versions depending on your preferences.  Blend until smooth, taking care to “burp” between pulses if it’s still quite hot.

Return to the pot, turn the heat to medium, and add the sour cream and water, the spices, lemon zest and juice, and salt and pepper to taste. Stir periodically to incorporate, and make sure it doesn’t burn. I like mine with a dollop of sour cream on top, but feel free to leave it out.


Dessert:

Rhubarb crisp! This NY Times recipe is quick to assemble, and might be nice to bake this weekend while it’s still so chilly!  1) Chop rhubarb, toss with sugar and lemon and put it in your casserole dish; 2) mix up the crumble ingredients (butter, brown sugar, flour, cinnamon, salt, rolled oats, pecans) and spread on top of rhubarb; 3) bake at 375F for 45 minutes.  The recipe calls for a food processor, but honestly you can mix the crumble part by hand or with a fork. Gluten-free flours such as rice or oat will also work well here, if you need to substitute for the (wheat) AP flour.
Pantry Check / Shopping List: butter, rhubarb, lemon juice, brown sugar, AP flour, cinnamon, rolled oats, pecans. 
Stay tuned for next week’s Market Menu, to see what’s new!
 -steph